MUSIC THERAPY

An alternative and effective approach to improve physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and spiritual health.

What is music therapy?
By the American Music Therapy Association's definition, Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program.
Music therapy enriches people's lives through music improvisation and music activities while helping individual's relieve stress, enhance cognitive and emotional regulation, promote attention to task, work on fine motor skills, express feelings, enhance memory, decrease depression, pain, and anxiety, and overall improves wellness and gives you a sense of self worth.​

 

How long does a session last?

An assessment will take place in the beginning of the individual sessions to determine a treatment plan and set goals for the client to find success in. Thereafter a typical session would last around 30 minutes. We never want to overwhelm a client or push them too far, our goal is always end with the client feeling positive and successful, so that they aren't leaving a session on a bad note.

How much does a session cost?
Pricing varies by program, please contact for details.

Music therapy can benefit individuals of all ages
in several ways.

No musical experience or ability is necessary, all levels are welcome!
Register now!

Music Therapy is for everyone!

Anyone of any age can benefit from music therapy, but specifically those along the autism spectrum, or may have attention deficit, cerebral palsy, down syndrome, Alzheimer's or dementia, depression or anxiety. Music therapists can also work with children’s individual education plan to enhance academic skills. If you, a loved one, or a friend is a person with a learning, intellectual, mental, or physical disability, music therapy can be extremely beneficial. Rock 'n Roll High School offers individual and group sessions that may be held at home or on site away from RnRHS.

Children
Teens & Adults
Geriatrics
Autism Spectrum
Special Education
Alzheimers

Music Therapy and Young Children

 

Music Therapy and Young Children

Music therapists involve children in singing, listening, moving, playing, and in creative activities that may help them become better learners.  Music therapist work on developing a child’s self –awareness, confidence, readiness skills, coping skills, and social behavior and may also provide pain management techniques.  They explore which styles of music, techniques, and instruments are most effective or motivating for each individual child and expand upon the child’s natural, spontaneous play in order to address areas of need. Music therapists develop a rapport with children. They observe the child’s behavior and interactions and assess communication, cognitive/academic, motor, social/emotional, and musical skills.  After developing realistic goals and target objectives, music therapists plan and implement systematic music therapy treatment programs with procedures and techniques designed specifically for the individual child.  Music therapists document responses, conduct ongoing evaluations of progress, and often make recommendations to other team members and the family regarding progress. Music therapists will also often make recommendations to team members and the family regarding ways to include successful music therapy techniques in other aspects of the child’s life.

 

  • Music stimulates all of the senses and involves the child at many levels.  This “multi-modal approach” facilitates many developmental skills.

  • Quality learning and maximum participation occur when children are permitted to experience the joy of play.  The medium of music therapy allows this play to occur naturally and frequently.

  • Music is highly motivating, yet it can also have a calming and relaxing effect.  Enjoyable music activities are designed to be success-oriented and make children feel better about themselves.

  • Music therapy can help a child manage pain and stressful situations.

  • Music can encourage socialization, self-expression, communication, and motor development.

  • Because the brain processes music in both hemispheres, music can stimulate cognitive functioning and may be used for remediation of some speech/language skills.​
     

 

Music Therapy and Teens

Music therapy for teens can be beneficial for their mental health, social skills, communication skills, and self esteem. Teens that have a difficult time expressing themselves, have attention deficit disorder, or mental health issues such as anxiety and depression can improve wellness by being involved in music. It is important for the therapist and client relationship to be based on trust and a sense of feeling safe in the musical environment.
 

A typical session with teens may include:

  • Journaling thoughts and emotions

  • Using journal entries to create lyrics and express emotions by creating improvisational and structured music.

  • Expressing emotions through improvisational piano playing, drumming out aggression, and creating art while listening to music to describe their feelings.

  • Working on building a repertoire of songs to sing or play and perform in front of family members or an audience of the clients choosing to create confidence.

  • Learning and applying breathing and relaxation exercises

  • Instrumental and musical exploration

Music Therapy and Adults

Music therapy can benefit adults with or without disabilities.  Adults with disabilities can learn about the world and how to use music to introduce them to ways to be independent. Using music as a motivator to learn about how to take care of themselves can help reduce the need of a caregiver.  Music helps the release of endorphins in the body and can act as a pain reliever. The increase in endorphons also reduces stress and lowers the heart rate, which can be beneficial for an adult with mental, physical, or emotional disabilities. Guided imagery would be a great relaxational exercise for adults who experience a lot of stress and need a way to unwind.  Drumming and musical exploration can be a great way to let out some steam and give adults the chance to express themselves in a way they might not get elsewhere.  Music therapy can be a great guide for adults with anxiety and depression.  There are a lot of musical tools used throughout sessions that can be beneficial in creating self respect, self care and self love through lyrical analysis, creating songs, journaling, and musical improvisation.

Music Therapy and Geriatrics

Music therapy treatment is efficacious and valid with older persons who have functional deficits in physical, psychological, cognitive or social functioning.  Research results and clinical experiences attest to the viability of music therapy even in those who are resistive to other treatment approaches.  Music is a form of sensory stimulation, which provokes responses due to the familiarity, predictability and feelings of security associated with it.​

 

  • Music therapy provides opportunities for:

    • Memory recall which contributes to reminiscence and satisfaction with life

    • Positive changes in mood and emotional states

    • Sense of control over life through successful experiences

    • Awareness of self and environment which accompanies increased attention to music

    • Anxiety and stress reduction for older adult and caregiver

    • Nonpharmacological management of pain and discomfort

    • Stimulation which provoked interest even when no other approach is effective

    • Structure which promotes rhythmic and continuous movement or vocal fluency as an adjunct to physical rehabilitation.

    • Emotional intimacy when spouses and families share creative music experiences

    • Social interaction with caregivers and families.

 

Music Therapy and Autism

  • Music therapy provides a unique variety of music experiences in an intentional and developmentally appropriate manner to effect changes in behavior and facilitate development of skills.

  • The literature reports that most individuals with ASD respond positively to music. People with ASD often show a heightened interest and response to music, making it an excellent therapeutic tool for working with them.

  • Music is a very basic human response, spanning all degrees of ability/disability. Music therapists are able to meet clients at their own levels and allow them to grow from there. The malleability of music makes it a medium that can be adapted to meet the needs of each individual.

  • Music is motivating and enjoyable. Music can promote relatedness, relaxation, learning, and self-expression.

  • Music therapy addresses multiple developmental issues simultaneously. Music therapy can provide success-oriented opportunities for achievement and mastery. The structure and sensory input inherent in music help to establish response and role expectations, positive interactions, and organization.

 

Music Therapy and Special Education

  • Music Therapy is considered a related service under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

  • When music therapy is deemed necessary to assist a child benefit from his/her special education, goals are documented on the Individualized Education Program (IEP) as a related service intervention.

  • Music therapy can be an integral component in helping the child with special needs attain educational goals identified by his/her IEP team.

  • Music therapy interventions can address development in cognitive, behavioral, physical, emotional, and social skills. Music therapy can also facilitate development in communication and sensorimotor skills.

  • Music therapy can offer direct or consultant services as determined by the individual needs of the child.

  • Music therapists can support special education classroom teachers by providing effective ways to incorporate music into their academic curriculum.

  • Music therapy involvement can stimulate attention and increase motivation to participate more fully in other aspects of the educational setting.

  • Music therapy interventions apply the inherent order of music to set behavioral expectations, provide reassurance, and maintain structure for children with special needs

  • Music therapy can adapt strategies to encourage a child’s participation in the least restrictive environment.

 

Music Therapy and Alzheimer's

Music therapy treatment is efficacious and valid with older persons who have functional deficits in physical, psychological, cognitive or social functioning.  Research results and clinical experiences attest to the viability of music therapy even in those who are resistive to other treatment approaches.  Music is a form of sensory stimulation, which provokes responses due to the familiarity, predictability and feelings of security associated with it.​

 

  • Music therapy provides opportunities for:

    • Memory recall which contributes to reminiscence and satisfaction with life

    • Positive changes in mood and emotional states

    • Sense of control over life through successful experiences

    • Awareness of self and environment which accompanies increased attention to music

    • Anxiety and stress reduction for older adult and caregiver

    • Nonpharmacological management of pain and discomfort

    • Stimulation which provoked interest even when no other approach is effective

    • Structure which promotes rhythmic and continuous movement or vocal fluency as an adjunct to physical rehabilitation.

    • Emotional intimacy when spouses and families share creative music experiences

    • Social interaction with caregivers and families.

 

Questions or concerns about Music Therapy?
 

Use the contact form to send our music therapist Emily a message.

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